Negacyclic Polynomial Multiplication

In this article I’ll cover three techniques to compute special types of polynomial products that show up in lattice cryptography and fully homomorphic encryption. Namely, the negacyclic polynomial product, which is the product of two polynomials in the quotient ring $\mathbb{Z}[x] / (x^N + 1)$. As a precursor to the negacyclic product, we’ll cover the simpler cyclic product.

All of the Python code written for this article is on GitHub.

The DFT and Cyclic Polynomial Multiplication

A recent program gallery piece showed how single-variable polynomial multiplication could be implemented using the Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT). This boils down to two observations:

  1. The product of two polynomials $f, g$ can be computed via the convolution of the coefficients of $f$ and $g$.
  2. The Convolution Theorem, which says that the Fourier transform of a convolution of two signals $f, g$ is the point-wise product of the Fourier transforms of the two signals. (The same holds for the DFT)

This provides a much faster polynomial product operation than one could implement using the naïve polynomial multiplication algorithm (though see the last section for an implementation anyway). The DFT can be used to speed up large integer multiplication as well.

A caveat with normal polynomial multiplication is that one needs to pad the input coefficient lists with enough zeros so that the convolution doesn’t “wrap around.” That padding results in the output having length at least as large as the sum of the degrees of $f$ and $g$ (see the program gallery piece for more details).

If you don’t pad the polynomials, instead you get what’s called a cyclic polynomial product. More concretely, if the two input polynomials $f, g$ are represented by coefficient lists $(f_0, f_1, \dots, f_{N-1}), (g_0, g_1, \dots, g_{N-1})$ of length $N$ (implying the inputs are degree at most $N-1$, i.e., the lists may end in a tail of zeros), then the Fourier Transform technique computes

\[ f(x) \cdot g(x) \mod (x^N – 1) \]

This modulus is in the sense of a quotient ring $\mathbb{Z}[x] / (x^N – 1)$, where $(x^N – 1)$ denotes the ring ideal generated by $x^N-1$, i.e., all polynomials that are evenly divisible by $x^N – 1$. A particularly important interpretation of this quotient ring is achieved by interpreting the ideal generator $x^N – 1$ as an equation $x^N – 1 = 0$, also known as $x^N = 1$. To get the canonical ring element corresponding to any polynomial $h(x) \in \mathbb{Z}[x]$, you “set” $x^N = 1$ and reduce the polynomial until there are no more terms with degree bigger than $N-1$. For example, if $N=5$ then $x^{10} + x^6 – x^4 + x + 2 = -x^4 + 2x + 3$ (the $x^{10}$ becomes 1, and $x^6 = x$).

To prove the DFT product computes a product in this particular ring, note how the convolution theorem produces the following formula, where $\textup{fprod}(f, g)$ denotes the process of taking the Fourier transform of the two coefficient lists, multiplying them entrywise, and taking a (properly normalized) inverse FFT, and $\textup{fprod}(f, g)(j)$ is the $j$-th coefficient of the output polynomial:

\[ \textup{fprod}(f, g)(j) = \sum_{k=0}^{N-1} f_k g_{j-k \textup{ mod } N} \]

In words, the output polynomial coefficient $j$ equals the sum of all products of pairs of coefficients whose indices sum to $j$ when considered “wrapping around” $N$. Fixing $j=1$ as an example, $\textup{fprod}(f, g)(1) = f_0 g_1 + f_1g_0 + f_2 g_{N-1} + f_3 g_{N-2} + \dots$. This demonstrates the “set $x^N = 1$” interpretation above: the term $f_2 g_{N-1}$ corresponds to the product $f_2x^2 \cdot g_{N-1}x^{N-1}$, which contributes to the $x^1$ term of the polynomial product if and only if $x^{2 + N-1} = x$, if and only if $x^N = 1$.

To achieve this in code, we simply use the version of the code from the program gallery piece, but fix the size of the arrays given to numpy.fft.fft in advance. We will also, for simplicity, assume the $N$ one wishes to use is a power of 2. The resulting code is significantly simpler than the original program gallery code (we omit zero-padding to length $N$ for brevity).

import numpy
from numpy.fft import fft, ifft

def cyclic_polymul(p1, p2, N):
    """Multiply two integer polynomials modulo (x^N - 1).

    p1 and p2 are arrays of coefficients in degree-increasing order.
    """
    assert len(p1) == len(p2) == N
    product = fft(p1) * fft(p2)
    inverted = ifft(product)
    return numpy.round(numpy.real(inverted)).astype(numpy.int32)

As a side note, there’s nothing that stops this from working with polynomials that have real or complex coefficients, but so long as we use small magnitude integer coefficients and round at the end, I don’t have to worry about precision issues (hat tip to Brad Lucier for suggesting an excellent paper by Colin Percival, “Rapid multiplication modulo the sum and difference of highly composite numbers“, which covers these precision issues in detail).

Negacyclic polynomials, DFT with duplication

Now the kind of polynomial quotient ring that shows up in cryptography is critically not $\mathbb{Z}[x]/(x^N-1)$, because that ring has enough easy-to-reason-about structure that it can’t hide secrets. Instead, cryptographers use the ring $\mathbb{Z}[x]/(x^N+1)$ (the minus becomes a plus), which is believed to be more secure for cryptography—although I don’t have a great intuitive grasp on why.

The interpretation is similar here as before, except we “set” $x^N = -1$ instead of $x^N = 1$ in our reductions. Repeating the above example, if $N=5$ then $x^{10} + x^6 – x^4 + x + 2 = -x^4 + 3$ (the $x^{10}$ becomes $(-1)^2 = 1$, and $x^6 = -x$). It’s called negacyclic because as a term $x^k$ passes $k \geq N$, it cycles back to $x^0 = 1$, but with a sign flip.

The negacyclic polynomial multiplication can’t use the DFT without some special hacks. The first and simplest hack is to double the input lists with a negation. That is, starting from $f(x) \in \mathbb{Z}[x]/(x^N+1)$, we can define $f^*(x) = f(x) – x^Nf(x)$ in a different ring $\mathbb{Z}[x]/(x^{2N} – 1)$ (and similarly for $g^*$ and $g$).

Before seeing how this causes the DFT to (almost) compute a negacyclic polynomial product, some math wizardry. The ring $\mathbb{Z}[x]/(x^{2N} – 1)$ is special because it contains our negacyclic ring as a subring. Indeed, because the polynomial $x^{2N} – 1$ factors as $(x^N-1)(x^N+1)$, and because these two factors are coprime in $\mathbb{Z}[x]/(x^{2N} – 1)$, the Chinese remainder theorem (aka Sun-tzu’s theorem) generalizes to polynomial rings and says that any polynomial in $\mathbb{Z}[x]/(x^{2N} – 1)$ is uniquely determined by its remainders when divided by $(x^N-1)$ and $(x^N+1)$. Another way to say it is that the ring $\mathbb{Z}[x]/(x^{2N} – 1)$ factors as a direct product of the two rings $\mathbb{Z}[x]/(x^{N} – 1)$ and $\mathbb{Z}[x]/(x^{N} + 1)$.

Now mapping a polynomial $f(x)$ from the bigger ring $(x^{2N} – 1)$ to the smaller ring $(x^{N}+1)$ involves taking a remainder of $f(x)$ when dividing by $x^{N}+1$ (“setting” $x^N = -1$ and reducing). There are many possible preimage mappings, depending on what your goal is. In this case, we actually intentionally choose a non preimage mapping, because in general to compute a preimage requires solving a system of congruences in the larger polynomial ring. So instead we choose $f(x) \mapsto f^*(x) = f(x) – x^Nf(x) = -f(x)(x^N – 1)$, which maps back down to $2f(x)$ in $\mathbb{Z}[x]/(x^{N} + 1)$. This preimage mapping has a particularly nice structure, in that you build it by repeating the polynomial’s coefficients twice and flipping the sign of the second half. It’s easy to see that the product $f^*(x) g^*(x)$ maps down to $4f(x)g(x)$.

So if we properly account for these extra constant factors floating around, our strategy to perform negacyclic polynomial multiplication is to map $f$ and $g$ up to the larger ring as described, compute their cyclic product (modulo $x^{2N} – 1$) using the FFT, and then the result should be a degree $2N-1$ polynomial which can be reduced with one more modular reduction step to the right degree $N-1$ negacyclic product, i.e., setting $x^N = -1$, which materializes as taking the second half of the coefficients, flipping their signs, and adding them to the corresponding coefficients in the first half.

The code for this is:

def negacyclic_polymul_preimage_and_map_back(p1, p2):
    p1_preprocessed = numpy.concatenate([p1, -p1])
    p2_preprocessed = numpy.concatenate([p2, -p2])
    product = fft(p1_preprocessed) * fft(p2_preprocessed)
    inverted = ifft(product)
    rounded = numpy.round(numpy.real(inverted)).astype(p1.dtype)
    return (rounded[: p1.shape[0]] - rounded[p1.shape[0] :]) // 4

However, this chosen mapping hides another clever trick. The product of the two preimages has enough structure that we can “read” the result off without doing the full “set $x^N = -1$” reduction step. Mapping $f$ and $g$ up to $f^*, g^*$ and taking their product modulo $(x^{2N} – 1)$ gives

\[ \begin{aligned} f^*g^* &= -f(x^N-1) \cdot -g(x^N – 1) \\ &= fg (x^N-1)^2 \\ &= fg(x^{2N} – 2x^N + 1) \\ &= fg(2 – 2x^N) \\ &= 2(fg – x^Nfg) \end{aligned} \]

This has the same syntactical format as the original mapping $f \mapsto f – x^Nf$, with an extra factor of 2, and so its coefficients also have the form “repeat the coefficients and flip the sign of the second half” (times two). We can then do the “inverse mapping” by reading only the first half of the coefficients and dividing by 2.

def negacyclic_polymul_use_special_preimage(p1, p2):
    p1_preprocessed = numpy.concatenate([p1, -p1])
    p2_preprocessed = numpy.concatenate([p2, -p2])
    product = fft(p1_preprocessed) * fft(p2_preprocessed)
    inverted = ifft(product)
    rounded = numpy.round(0.5 * numpy.real(inverted)).astype(p1.dtype)
    return rounded[: p1.shape[0]]

Our chosen mapping $f \mapsto f-x^Nf$ is not particularly special, except that it uses a small number of pre and post-processing operations. For example, if you instead used the mapping $f \mapsto 2f + x^Nf$ (which would map back to $f$ exactly), then the FFT product would result in $5fg + 4x^Nfg$ in the larger ring. You can still read off the coefficients as before, but you’d have to divide by 5 instead of 2 (which, the superstitious would say, is harder). It seems that “double and negate” followed by “halve and take first half” is the least amount of pre/post processing possible.

Negacyclic polynomials with a “twist”

The previous section identified a nice mapping (or embedding) of the input polynomials into a larger ring. But studying that shows some symmetric structure in the FFT output. I.e., the coefficients of $f$ and $g$ are repeated twice, with some scaling factors. It also involves taking an FFT of two $2N$-dimensional vectors when we start from two $N$-dimensional vectors.

This sort of situation should make you think that we can do this more efficiently, either by using a smaller size FFT or by packing some data into the complex part of the input, and indeed we can do both.

[Aside: it’s well known that if all the entries of an FFT input are real, then the result also has symmetry that can be exploted for efficiency by reframing the problem as a size-N/2 FFT in some cases, and just removing half the FFT algorithm’s steps in other cases, see Wikipedia for more]

This technique was explained in Fast multiplication and its applications (pdf link) by Daniel Bernstein, a prominent cryptographer who specializes in cryptography performance, and whose work appears in widely-used standards like TLS, OpenSSH, and he designed a commonly used elliptic curve for cryptography.

[Aside: Bernstein cites this technique as using something called the “Tangent FFT (pdf link).” This is a drop-in FFT replacement he invented that is faster than previous best (split-radix FFT), and Bernstein uses it mainly to give a precise expression for the number of operations required to do the multiplication end to end. We will continue to use the numpy FFT implementation, since in this article I’m just focusing on how to express negacyclic multiplication in terms of the FFT. Also worth noting both the Tangent FFT and “Fast multiplication” papers frame their techniques—including FFT algorithm implementations!—in terms of polynomial ring factorizations and mappings. Be still, my beating cardioid.]

In terms of polynomial mappings, we start from the ring $\mathbb{R}[x] / (x^N + 1)$, where $N$ is a power of 2. We then pick a reversible mapping from $\mathbb{R}[x]/(x^N + 1) \to \mathbb{C}[x]/(x^{N/2} – 1)$ (note the field change from real to complex), apply the FFT to the image of the mapping, and reverse appropriately it at the end.

One such mapping takes two steps, first mapping $\mathbb{R}[x]/(x^N + 1) \to \mathbb{C}[x]/(x^{N/2} – i)$ and then from $\mathbb{C}[x]/(x^{N/2} – i) \to \mathbb{C}[x]/(x^{N/2} – 1)$. The first mapping is as easy as the last section, because $(x^N + 1) = (x^{N/2} + i) (x^{N/2} – i)$, and so we can just set $x^{N/2} = i$ and reduce the polynomial. This as the effect of making the second half of the polynomial’s coefficients become the complex part of the first half of the coefficients.

The second mapping is more nuanced, because we’re not just reducing via factorization. And we can’t just map $i \mapsto 1$ generically, because that would reduce complex numbers down to real values. Instead, we observe that (momentarily using an arbitrary degree $k$ instead of $N/2$), for any polynomial $f \in \mathbb{C}[x]$, the remainder of $f \mod x^k-i$ uniquely determines the remainder of $f \mod x^k – 1$ via the change of variables $x \mapsto \omega_{4k} x$, where $\omega_{4k}$ is a $4k$-th primitive root of unity $\omega_{4k} = e^{\frac{2 \pi i}{4k}}$. Spelling this out in more detail: if $f(x) \in \mathbb{C}[x]$ has remainder $f(x) = g(x) + h(x)(x^k – i)$ for some polynomial $h(x)$, then

\[ \begin{aligned} f(\omega_{4k}) &= g(\omega_{4k}) + h(\omega_{4k})((\omega_{4k}x)^{k} – i) \\ &= g(\omega_{4k}) + h(\omega_{4k})(e^{\frac{\pi i}{2}} x^k – i) \\ &= g(\omega_{4k}) + i h(\omega_{4k})(x^k – 1) \\ &= g(\omega_{4k}) \mod (x^k – 1) \end{aligned} \]

Translating this back to $k=N/2$, the mapping from $\mathbb{C}[x]/(x^{N/2} – i) \to \mathbb{C}[x]/(x^{N/2} – 1)$ is $f(x) \mapsto f(\omega_{2N}x)$. And if $f = f_0 + f_1x + \dots + f_{N/2 – 1}x^{N/2 – 1}$, then the mapping involves multiplying each coefficient $f_k$ by $\omega_{2N}^k$.

When you view polynomials as if they were a simple vector of their coefficients, then this operation $f(x) \mapsto f(\omega_{k}x)$ looks like $(a_0, a_1, \dots, a_n) \mapsto (a_0, \omega_{k} a_1, \dots, \omega_k^n a_n)$. Bernstein calls the operation a twist of $\mathbb{C}^n$, which I mused about in this Mathstodon thread.

What’s most important here is that each of these transformations are invertible. The first because the top half coefficients end up in the complex parts of the polynomial, and the second because the mapping $f(x) \mapsto f(\omega_{2N}^{-1}x)$ is an inverse. Together, this makes the preprocessing and postprocessing exact inverses of each other. The code is then

def negacyclic_polymul_complex_twist(p1, p2):
    n = p2.shape[0]
    primitive_root = primitive_nth_root(2 * n)
    root_powers = primitive_root ** numpy.arange(n // 2)

    p1_preprocessed = (p1[: n // 2] + 1j * p1[n // 2 :]) * root_powers
    p2_preprocessed = (p2[: n // 2] + 1j * p2[n // 2 :]) * root_powers

    p1_ft = fft(p1_preprocessed)
    p2_ft = fft(p2_preprocessed)
    prod = p1_ft * p2_ft
    ifft_prod = ifft(prod)
    ifft_rotated = ifft_prod * primitive_root ** numpy.arange(0, -n // 2, -1)

    return numpy.round(
        numpy.concatenate([numpy.real(ifft_rotated), numpy.imag(ifft_rotated)])
    ).astype(p1.dtype)

And so, at the cost of a bit more pre- and postprocessing, we can negacyclically multiply two degree $N-1$ polynomials using an FFT of length $N/2$. In theory, no information is wasted and this is optimal.

And finally, a simple matrix multiplication

The last technique I wanted to share is not based on the FFT, but it’s another method for doing negacyclic polynomial multiplication that has come in handy in situations where I am unable to use FFTs. I call it the Toeplitz method, because one of the polynomials is converted to a Toeplitz matrix. Sometimes I hear it referred to as a circulant matrix technique, but due to the negacyclic sign flip, I don’t think it’s a fully accurate term.

The idea is to put the coefficients of one polynomial $f(x) = f_0 + f_1x + \dots + f_{N-1}x^{N-1}$ into a matrix as follows:

\[ \begin{pmatrix} f_0 & -f_{N-1} & \dots & -f_1 \\ f_1 & f_0 & \dots & -f_2 \\ \vdots & \vdots & \ddots & \vdots \\ f_{N-1} & f_{N-2} & \dots & f_0 \end{pmatrix} \]

The polynomial coefficients are written down in the first column unchanged, then in each subsequent column, the coefficients are cyclically shifted down one, and the term that wraps around the top has its sign flipped. When the second polynomial is treated as a vector of its coefficients, say, $g(x) = g_0 + g_1x + \dots + g_{N-1}x^{N-1}$, then the matrix-vector product computes their negacyclic product (as a vector of coefficients):

\[ \begin{pmatrix} f_0 & -f_{N-1} & \dots & -f_1 \\ f_1 & f_0 & \dots & -f_2 \\ \vdots & \vdots & \ddots & \vdots \\ f_{N-1} & f_{N-2} & \dots & f_0 \end{pmatrix} \begin{pmatrix} g_0 \\ g_1 \\ \vdots \\ g_{N-1} \end{pmatrix} \]

This works because each row $j$ corresponds to one output term $x^j$, and the cyclic shift for that row accounts for the degree-wrapping, with the sign flip accounting for the negacyclic part. (If there were no sign attached, this method could be used to compute a cyclic polynomial product).

The Python code for this is

def cylic_matrix(c: numpy.array) -> numpy.ndarray:
    """Generates a cyclic matrix with each row of the input shifted.

    For input: [1, 2, 3], generates the following matrix:

        [[1 2 3]
         [2 3 1]
         [3 1 2]]
    """
    c = numpy.asarray(c).ravel()
    a, b = numpy.ogrid[0 : len(c), 0 : -len(c) : -1]
    indx = a + b
    return c[indx]


def negacyclic_polymul_toeplitz(p1, p2):
    n = len(p1)

    # Generates a sign matrix with 1s below the diagonal and -1 above.
    up_tri = numpy.tril(numpy.ones((n, n), dtype=int), 0)
    low_tri = numpy.triu(numpy.ones((n, n), dtype=int), 1) * -1
    sign_matrix = up_tri + low_tri

    cyclic_matrix = cylic_matrix(p1)
    toeplitz_p1 = sign_matrix * cyclic_matrix
    return numpy.matmul(toeplitz_p1, p2)

Obviously on most hardware this would be less efficient than an FFT-based method (and there is some relationship between circulant matrices and Fourier Transforms, see Wikipedia). But in some cases—when the polynomials are small, or one of the two polynomials is static, or a particular hardware choice doesn’t handle FFTs with high-precision floats very well, or you want to take advantage of natural parallelism in the matrix-vector product—this method can be useful. It’s also simpler to reason about.

Until next time!

Polynomial Multiplication Using the FFT

Problem: Compute the product of two polynomials efficiently.

Solution:

import numpy
from numpy.fft import fft, ifft


def poly_mul(p1, p2):
    """Multiply two polynomials.

    p1 and p2 are arrays of coefficients in degree-increasing order.
    """
    deg1 = p1.shape[0] - 1
    deg2 = p1.shape[0] - 1
    # Would be 2*(deg1 + deg2) + 1, but the next-power-of-2 handles the +1
    total_num_pts = 2 * (deg1 + deg2)
    next_power_of_2 = 1 << (total_num_pts - 1).bit_length()

    ff_p1 = fft(numpy.pad(p1, (0, next_power_of_2 - p1.shape[0])))
    ff_p2 = fft(numpy.pad(p2, (0, next_power_of_2 - p2.shape[0])))
    product = ff_p1 * ff_p2
    inverted = ifft(product)
    rounded = numpy.round(numpy.real(inverted)).astype(numpy.int32)
    return numpy.trim_zeros(rounded, trim='b')

Discussion: The Fourier Transform has a lot of applications to science, and I’ve covered it on this blog before, see the Signal Processing section of Main Content. But it also has applications to fast computational mathematics.

The naive algorithm for multiplying two polynomials is the “grade-school” algorithm most readers will already be familiar with (see e.g., this page), but for large polynomials that algorithm is slow. It requires $O(n^2)$ arithmetic operations to multiply two polynomials of degree $n$.

This short tip shows a different approach, which is based on the idea of polynomial interpolation. As a side note, I show the basic theory of polynomial interpolation in chapter 2 of my book, A Programmer’s Introduction to Mathematics, along with an application to cryptography called “Secret Sharing.”

The core idea is that given $n+1$ distinct evaluations of a polynomial $p(x)$ (i.e., points $(x, p(x))$ with different $x$ inputs), you can reconstruct the coefficients of $p(x)$ exactly. And if you have two such point sets for two different polynomials $p(x), q(x)$, a valid point set of the product $(pq)(x)$ is the product of the points that have the same $x$ inputs.

\[ \begin{aligned} p(x) &= \{ (x_0, p(x_0)), (x_1, p(x_1)), \dots, (x_n, p(x_n)) \} \\ q(x) &= \{ (x_0, q(x_0)), (x_1, q(x_1)), \dots, (x_n, q(x_n)) \} \\ (pq)(x) &= \{ (x_0, p(x_0)q(x_0)), (x_1, p(x_1)q(x_1)), \dots, (x_n, p(x_n)q(x_n)) \} \end{aligned} \]

The above uses $=$ loosely to represent that the polynomial $p$ can be represented by the point set on the right hand side.

So given two polynomials $p(x), q(x)$ in their coefficient forms, one can first convert them to their point forms, multiply the points, and then reconstruct the resulting product.

The problem is that the two conversions, both to and from the coefficient form, are inefficient for arbitrary choices of points $x_0, \dots, x_n$. The trick comes from choosing special points, in such a way that the intermediate values computed in the conversion steps can be reused. This is where the Fourier Transform comes in: choose $x_0 = \omega_{N}$, the complex-N-th root of unity, and $x_k = \omega_N^k$ as its exponents. $N$ is required to be large enough so that $\omega_N$’s exponents have at least $2n+1$ distinct values required for interpolating a degree-at-most-$2n$ polynomial, and because we’re doing the Fourier Transform, it will naturally be “the next largest power of 2” bigger than the degree of the product polynomial.

Then one has to observe that, by its very formula, the Fourier Transform is exactly the evaluation of a polynomial at the powers of the $N$-th root of unity! In formulas: if $a = (a_0, \dots, a_{n-1})$ is a list of real numbers define $p_a(x) = a_0 + a_1x + \dots + a_{n-1}x^{n-1}$. Then $\mathscr{F}(a)(k)$, the Fourier Transform of $a$ at index $k$, is equal to $p_a(\omega_n^k)$. These notes by Denis Pankratov have more details showing that the Fourier Transform formula is a polynomial evaluation (see Section 3), and this YouTube video by Reducible also has a nice exposition. This interpretation of the FT as polynomial evaluation seems to inspire quite a few additional techniques for computing the Fourier Transform that I plan to write about in the future.

The last step is to reconstruct the product polynomial from the product of the two point sets, but because the Fourier Transform is an invertible function (and linear, too), the inverse Fourier Transform does exactly that: given a list of the $n$ evaluations of a polynomial at $\omega_n^k, k=0, \dots, n-1$, return the coefficients of the polynomial.

This all fits together into the code above:

  1. Pad the input coefficient lists with zeros, so that the lists are a power of 2 and at least 1 more than the degree of the output product polynomial.
  2. Compute the FFT of the two padded polynomials.
  3. Multiply the result pointwise.
  4. Compute the IFFT of the product.
  5. Round the resulting (complex) values back to integers.

Hey, wait a minute! What about precision issues?

They are a problem when you have large numbers or large polynomials, because the intermediate values in steps 2-4 can lose precision due to the floating point math involved. This short note of Richard Fateman discusses some of those issues, and two paths forward include: deal with it somehow, or use an integer-exact analogue called the Number Theoretic Transform (which itself has issues I’ll discuss in a future, longer article).

Postscript: I’m not sure how widely this technique is used. It appears the NTL library uses the polynomial version of Karatsuba multiplication instead (though it implements FFT elsewhere). However, I know for sure that much software involved in doing fully homomorphic encryption rely on the FFT for performance reasons, and the ones that don’t instead use the NTT.

Carnival of Mathematics #209

Welcome to the 209th Carnival of Mathematics!

209 has a few distinctions, including being the smallest number with 6 representations as a sum of 3 positive squares:

$$\begin{aligned}209 &= 1^2 + 8^2 + 12^2 \\ &= 2^2 + 3^2 + 14^2 \\ &= 2^2 + 6^2 + 13^2 \\ &= 3^2 + 10^2 + 10^2 \\ &= 4^2 + 7^2 + 12^2 \\ &= 8^2 + 8^2 + 9^2 \end{aligned}$$

As well as being the 43rd Ulam number, the number of partitions of 16 into relatively prime parts and the number of partitions of 63 into squares.

Be sure to submit fun math you find in October to the next carvinal host!

Math YouTubers

The Heidelberg Laureate forum took place, which featured lectures from renowned mathematicians and computer scientists, like Rob Tarjan and Avi Wigderson on the CS theory side, as well as a panel discussion on post-quantum cryptography with none other than Vint Cerf, Whitfield Diffie, and Adi Shamir. All the videos are on YouTube.

Tom Edgar, who is behind the Mathematical Visual Proofs YouTube channel, published a video (using manim) exploring for which $n$ it is possible to divide a disk into $n$ equal pieces using a straightedge and compass. It was based on a proof from Roger Nelsen’s and Claudi Alsina’s book, “Icons of Mathematics”.

The folks at Ganit Charcha also published a talk “Fascinating Facts About Pi” from a Pi Day 2022 celebration. The video includes a question that was new to me about interpreting subsequences of pi digits as indexes and doing reverse lookups until you find a loop.

Henry Segerman published two nice videos, including one on an illusion of a square and circle in the same shape, and a preview of a genus-2 holonomy maze (Augh, my wallet! I have both of his original holonomy mazes and my houseguests love playing with them!)

Steve Mould published a nice video about the Chladni figures used (or adapted) in the new Lord of the Rings TV series’ title sequence.

The Simons institute has been doing a workshop on graph limits, which aims to cover some of the theory about things like low-rank matrix completion, random graphs, and various models of networks. Their lectures are posted on their YouTube page.

Math Twitter

Peter Rowlett shared a nice activity with his son about distinct colorings of a square divided into four triangular regions.

Krystal Guo showed off her approach to LiveTeX’ing lectures.

Tamás Görbe gave a nice thread about a function that enumerates all rational numbers exactly once.

Every math club leader should be called the Prime Minister.

In doing research for my book, I was writing a chapter on balanced incomplete block designs, and I found a few nice tidbits in threads (thread 1, thread 2). A few here: Latin squares were on Islamic amulets from the 1200’s. The entire back catalog of “The Mathematical Scientist” journal is available on Google Drive, and through it I found an old article describing the very first use of Latin squares for experimental design, in which a man ran an experiment on what crop was best to feed his sheep during the winter months in France in the 1800’s. Finally, I determined that NFL season scheduling is done via integer linear programming.

Math Bloggers

Lúcás Meier published a nice article at the end of August (which I only discovered in September, it counts!) going over the details of his favorite cryptography paper “Unifying Zero-Knowledge Proofs of Knowledge”, by Ueli Maurer, which gives a single zero-knowledge protocol that generalizes Schnorr, Fiat-Shamir, and a few others for proving knowledge of logarithms and roots.

Ralph Levien published a blog post about how to efficiently draw a decent approximation to the curve parallel to a given cubic Bezier curve. He has a previous blog post about fitting cubic Beziers to data, and a variety of other interesting graphics-inspired math articles in between articles about Rust and GPUs.

Key Switching in LWE

Last time we covered an operation in the LWE encryption scheme called modulus switching, which allows one to switch from one modulus to another, at the cost of introducing a small amount of extra noise, roughly $\sqrt{n}$, where $n$ is the dimension of the LWE ciphertext.

This time we’ll cover a more sophisticated operation called key switching, which allows one to switch an LWE ciphertext from being encrypted under one secret key to another, without ever knowing either secret key.

Reminder of LWE

A literal repetition of the last article. The LWE encryption scheme I’ll use has the following parameters:

  • A plaintext space $\mathbb{Z}/q\mathbb{Z}$, where $q \geq 2$ is a positive integer. This is the space that the underlying message comes from.
  • An LWE dimension $n \in \mathbb{N}$.
  • A discrete Gaussian error distribution $D$ with a mean of zero and a fixed standard deviation.

An LWE secret key is defined as a vector in $\{0, 1\}^n$ (uniformly sampled). An LWE ciphertext is defined as a vector $a = (a_1, \dots, a_n)$, sampled uniformly over $(\mathbb{Z} / q\mathbb{Z})^n$, and a scalar $b = \langle a, s \rangle + m + e$, where $e$ is drawn from $D$ and all arithmetic is done modulo $q$. Note that $e$ must be small for the encryption to be valid.

Sometimes I will denote by $\textup{LWE}_s(x)$ the LWE encryption of plaintext $x$ under the secret key $s$, and it should be understood that this is a fixed (but arbitrary) draw from the distribution of LWE ciphertexts described above.

Main idea: homomorphically almost-decrypt

The main idea is to encrypt each entry of the original secret key using the new secret key (this collection of encryptions is jointly called a key-switching key), and then use this to homomorphically evaluate the first step of the decryption function (i.e., compute $b – \langle a, s \rangle$). The result is an encryption of the (noisy) message under the new key.

First we’ll show how this works in a naïve sense. In particular, doing what I said in the last paragraph verbatim won’t work because the error will grow too large. But we’ll do it anyway, measure the error, and the remainder of the article will show how the gadget decomposition can be used to reduce the error.

Key switching, without gadget decompositions

Start with an LWE ciphertext for the plaintext $m$. Call it

$\displaystyle c = (a_1, \dots, a_n, b) \in (\mathbb{Z}/q\mathbb{Z})^{n+1}$

where

$\displaystyle b = \left ( \sum_{i=1}^n a_i s_i \right ) + m + e_{\textup{original}}$

and $s = (s_1, \dots, s_n) \in \{ 0,1\}^n$ is the secret key. Now say we have another secret key, possibly of a different dimension $t = (t_1, \dots, t_m) \in \{ 0, 1\}^m$, and we would like to switch the ciphertext $c$ to a ciphertext $c’$ which encrypts the same underlying message $m$, but under the new secret key $t$. That is, we would like to write

$\displaystyle c’ = (a’_1, \dots, a’_m, b’) \in (\mathbb{Z}/q\mathbb{Z})^{m+1}$

where

$\displaystyle b’ = \left ( \sum_{i=1}^n a’_i t_i \right ) + m + e_{\textup{original}} + e_{\textup{new}}$

implying that there is possibly some additional error introduced as a result. As usual, so long as the total error in the ciphertext remains small enough (and $m$ is stored in the significant bits of the underlying integer space), the result will still be a valid LWE ciphertext.

Define the key switching key $\textup{KSK}(s, t)$ as follows (I will omit the $s, t$ and just call it KSK from now on):

$\displaystyle \textup{KSK} = \{ \textup{KSK}_i = \textup{LWE}_t(s_i) = (x_{i, 1}, \dots, x_{i, m}, y_i) \mid i=1, \dots, n\}$

In other words, $\textup{KSK}_i$ encrypts bit $s_i$, and $y_i = \langle x_i, t \rangle + s_i + e_i$ makes it a valid LWE encryption.

Now the algorithm to switch keys is merely as follows (where the first vector has $m$ leading zeros to ensure the dimensions align):

$\displaystyle c’ = (0, \dots, 0, b) – \sum_{i=1}^n a_i \textup{KSK}_i$

This is computing a linear combination of the $\textup{KSK}_i$. The specific linear combination is the first step of LWE decryption ($b – \langle a, s \rangle$), but performed on ciphertexts of $b$ and the $s_i$. Note, $(0, \dots, 0, b)$ is a valid (but insecure) LWE ciphertext of $b$ under any secret key, in part because we’re pretending the LWE samples and error were all sampled as zero; an unlikely but coherent outcome used to jumpstart a homomorphic computation in more places than key switching. So if you wanted to, you could write $c’$ as follows, to highlight how we’re computing additions and linear scalings of LWE ciphertexts.

$\displaystyle c’ = \textup{LWE}_{\textup{t}}(b) – \sum_{i=1}^n a_i \textup{LWE}_t(s_i)$

This should be enough to show that $c’$ is a valid LWE encryption (if we accept that adding and scaling preserves LWE validity). But to warm up for the rest of the article we’ll reprove it with a slightly different technique. This will also help us understand the error growth. Because LWE naturally admits sums and scalar products with corresponding added error, we expect the error to grow proportionally to the number of additions and the magnitudes of the $a_i$’s. And you may already be able to tell that because the $a_i$’s are uniform $\mathbb{Z}/q\mathbb{Z}$ elements, this part will be far too large to be useful. Let’s make this explicit now.

To show it’s a valid LWE encryption, we define the function $\varphi_s$, defined on any LWE ciphertext $c = (a_1, \dots, a_n, b)$ as $\varphi_s(c) = b – \langle a, s \rangle$. Some authors call $\varphi_s$ the “phase” function, but I think of it as a close friend: the first step of the decryption function for LWE (the second step would be rounding off the error). Critically, an LWE encryption is valid if and only if $\varphi_s(c) = m + e$ (provided $e$ is sufficiently small).

Because $\varphi_s$ is a linear function, it factors through the definition of $c’$ nicely, and we get

$\displaystyle \begin{aligned} \varphi_t(c’) &= \varphi_t((0, \dots, 0, b)) – \sum_{i=1}^n a_i \varphi_t(\textup{KSK}_i) \\ &= b – \sum_{i=1}^n a_i (y_i – \langle x_i, t \rangle) \\ &= b – \sum_{i=1}^n a_i (s_i + e_i) \end{aligned}$

where (reminder) $e_i$ is the error sample from $\textup{KSK}_i$’s definition. Distributing $a_i$ across the $(s_i + e_i)$ simplifies everything nicely

$\displaystyle \begin{aligned} &= b – \sum_{i=1}^n a_i s_i – \sum_{i=1}^n a_i e_i \\ &= m + e_{\textup{original}} – \sum_{i=1}^n a_i e_i \end{aligned}$

Now as we foreshadowed, $e_{\textup{new}} = -\sum_{i=1}^n a_i e_i$ is simply too large. A typical LWE ciphertext will have error at least 1 (or it would be useless), and if $q = 2^{32}$, the $a_i$’s would also be of magnitude roughly $2^{31}$, so summing even two of those would corrupt even a 1-bit message stored in the most significant bit of the plaintext.

The way to deal with this is to use a bit decomposition.

Key switching, with gadget decompositions

Recall from the gadget decomposition article that the core function of a gadget decomposition is to preserve the ultimate value of a dot product while making the vectors multiplicands larger (spending space/time) but also making the size of the coefficients of one of the vectors smaller (reducing the accumulation of error due to that dot product).

This is exactly the approach we’ll take here. The “dot product” in question is $(a_1, \dots, a_n) \cdot \textup{KSK}$ (where KSK is viewed as a matrix), and we’ll expand the values $a_i$ into a vector of its digits in a base-$B$ number system, while modifying the key switching key so that those missing powers of $B$ are part of the LWE encryption. This will result in replacing the error term that looked like $\sum_{i=1}^n a_i e_i$ with an error term like $\sum_{i=1}^n c B e_i$ for some small constant $c$ (expect it to be even less than $B$).

More specifically, define decomposition parameters as a triple of numbers $(B, k, L)$. The number $B$ is a power of 2 no bigger than $q/2$, and $L$, or the number of levels of the decomposition, is the positive integer such that $B^L = q$ (this is forced by the choice of $B$). Then finally, $k$ is a number between $0$ and $L-1$ describing the “lowest level” (or least-significant digit) included in the decomposition.

An error-free decomposition sets the parameter $k=0$, and this is defined simply as a base-$B$ representation of a number. For example, suppose $q = 2^{32}$, and $(B, k, L) = (256, 0, 4)$, and we’re decomposing $x=2^{32} – 2$. Then $\textup{Decomp}_{256, 0, 4}(x) = (254, 255, 255, 255)$. I subtracted 2 to emphasize that the digits are little-Endian (the right-most entry is the most significant, representing the $256^3$ place).

An approximate decomposition is one with $k > 0$. For example, suppose $(B, k, L) = (256, 2, 4)$ and again $x=2^{32} – 2$. Setting $k=2$ means that we represent this number as if it were $(0, 0, 255, 255)$, wiping out the two least significant digits. The error of this approximation is $65534 = 254 + 255 \cdot 256^1$. As we will see, an approximate decomposition may help reduce overall error by splitting the newly introduced error into a sum of two terms, where $k$ scales the error differently in each term.

Let’s go through the key-switching key derivation again, using an error-free decomposition $(B, 0, L)$. First, re-define the key switching key as follows.

$\displaystyle \textup{KSK} = \{ \textup{KSK}_{i, j} = \textup{LWE}_t(s_i B^j) \mid i=1, \dots, n ; j = 0, \dots, L-1\}$

Note that this increases the dimension of the key-switching key by 1. Previously the key-switching key was a list of LWE ciphertexts (2-dimensional array of numbers), and now it’s a 3-dimensional array, with the new dimension corresponding to the decomposition digit $j$.

Because the powers of $B$ are attached to the message, they will factor out and allow us to reconstruct the original $a_i$’s, but they will not be included in the error part because error is added to the message during encryption.

Next, to perform the key switch, define $\textup{Decomp}(a_i) = (a_{i,0}, \dots, a_{i,L-1})$ and compute

$\displaystyle c’ = (0, \dots, 0, b) – \sum_{i=1}^n \sum_{j=0}^{L-1} a_{i,j} \textup{KSK}_{i,j}$

This is the same as the original key switch, but the extra summation accounts for the extra dimension introduced by the gadget decomposition. Then we can repeat the same $\varphi_t$ trick and see how the original $a_i$’s are reconstructed.

$\displaystyle \begin{aligned} \varphi_t(c’) &= b – \sum_{i=1}^n \sum_{j=0}^{L-1} a_{i,j} \varphi_t(\textup{KSK}_{i,j}) \\ &= b -\sum_{i=1}^n \sum_{j=0}^{L-1} a_{i,j} (s_i B^j + e_i) \\ &= b -\sum_{i=1}^n \sum_{j=0}^{L-1} a_{i,j} s_i B^j – \sum_{i=1}^n \sum_{j=0}^{L-1} a_{i,j} e_i \\ &= b -\sum_{i=1}^n a_i s_i – \sum_{i=1}^n \sum_{j=0}^{L-1} a_{i,j} e_i \\ &= m + e_{\textup{original}} – \sum_{i=1}^n \sum_{j=0}^{L-1} a_{i,j} e_i \end{aligned}$

One key ingredient above is noticing that in $\sum_{i=1}^n \sum_{j=0}^{L-1} a_{i,j} s_i B^j$, the $s_i$ factors out of the innermost sum, and what you have left is $\sum_{j=0}^{L-1} a_{i,j} B^j$, which is exactly how to reconstruct $a_i$ from its base-$B$ digits.

The second key ingredient is that the innermost term on the second line is $a_{i,j} (s_i B^j + e_i)$, which means that only the digits $a_{i,j}$ are multiplied by the error terms, not including the powers of $B$, and so the final error can be bounded by the largest allowable value of a single digit $B-1$, resulting in the new error being $L (B-1) \sum_{i=1}^n e_i$. For a Gaussian centered at zero, the expectation of these errors is zero, and using standard bounding arguments like Chernoff bounds, you can prove that with high probability this new error is at most $L(B-1) \sigma \sqrt{2n \log n}$, where $\sigma$ is the standard deviation of the error distribution.

Now, finally, we can run through this argument one more time, but using an approximate decomposition. This merely changes the sum’s lower bound from $j=0$ to $j=k$. Start by calling $\tilde{a}_i = \sum_{j=k}^{L-1} a_{i,j} B^j$, the approximation of $a_i$ from its most significant bits. Then the error of this approximation is $a_i – \tilde{a}_i = \sum_{j=0}^{k-1} a_{i,j} B^j$, a relatively small quantity at most $(B^k – 1) / (B-1)$ (if each $a_{i,j} = B-1$ is as large as possible).

$\displaystyle \begin{aligned} \varphi_t(c’) &= b – \sum_{i=1}^n \sum_{j=k}^{L-1} a_{i,j} \varphi_t(\textup{KSK}_{i,j}) \\ &= b -\sum_{i=1}^n \sum_{j=k}^{L-1} a_{i,j} (s_i B^j + e_i) \\ &= b -\sum_{i=1}^n s_i \sum_{j=k}^{L-1} a_{i,j} B^j – \sum_{i=1}^n \sum_{j=k}^{L-1} a_{i,j} e_i \\ &= b -\sum_{i=1}^n s_i \tilde{a}_i – \sum_{i=1}^n \sum_{j=k}^{L-1} a_{i,j} e_i \end{aligned}$

Mentally zoom in on the first sum $\sum_{i=1}^n s_i \tilde{a}_i$. Use the trick of adding zero to get

$\displaystyle \sum_{i=1}^n s_i \tilde{a}_i = \sum_{i=1}^n s_i (a_i + \tilde{a}_i – a_i) = \sum_{i=1}^n s_i a_i – \sum_{i=1}^n s_i(a_i – \tilde{a}_i)$

The term $\sum_{i=1}^n s_i(a_i – \tilde{a}_i)$ is part of our new error term, and recalling that the secret key bits are binary, you should think of this in expectation as roughly $\frac{n}{2} B^{k-1}$ (more precisely, $\frac{n}{2} (B^{k}-1)/(B-1)$).

Continuing, we arrive at

$\displaystyle \begin{aligned} \varphi_t(c’) &= b -\sum_{i=1}^n a_i s_i – \sum_{i=1}^n s_i(a_i – \tilde{a}_i) – \sum_{i=1}^n \sum_{j=k}^{L-1} a_{i,j} e_i \\ &= m + e_{\textup{original}} – \sum_{i=1}^n s_i(a_i – \tilde{a}_i) – \sum_{i=1}^n \sum_{j=k}^{L-1} a_{i,j} e_i \end{aligned}$

Rough error analysis

Now the choice of $k$ admits a tradeoff that one can optimize for to minimize the total newly introduced error. I’m going to switch to a sloppy mode of math to heuristically navigate this tradeoff.

The triangle inequality lets us bound the magnitude of the error by the sum of the magnitudes of the parts, i.e., the error is bounded from above by

$\displaystyle \left | \sum_{i=1}^n s_i(a_i – \tilde{a}_i) \right | + \left | \sum_{i=1}^n \sum_{j=k}^{L-1} a_{i,j} e_i \right |$

The left term is like $\frac{n}{2} B^{k-1}$ as we stated earlier, and with high probability it’s at most $(n/2 + \sqrt{n \log n}) B^{k-1}$. The right term is at most $(L-k)B \sum_{i=1}^n e_i$, (worst case size of $a_{i,j}$, increasing $B-1$ to $B$ because why not), and with high probability the sum of the $e_i$ is like $\sigma \sqrt{2n \log n}$, making the whole term bounded by $(L-k)B \sigma \sqrt{2n \log n}$. So we want to minimize the sum

$\displaystyle (n/2 + \sqrt{n \log n}) B^{k-1} + (L-k)B \sigma \sqrt{2n \log n}$

We could try to explicitly optimize this for $k$, treating the other terms as constant, but it won’t be nice because $k$ is present in both a linear term and an exponent. We could also just stare at it and think. The approximation error (the term on the left) is going to get exponentially larger as $k$ grows, so we want to keep $k$ relatively small. But on the other hand, the standard deviation $\sigma$ should be much larger than $n$ to keep LWE secure. This is effectively what we’re trying to suppress: error that grows like $O(n)$ is small enough to deal with, but error that grows like $\omega(n)$ is problematic. Increasing $k$ gives us a meager (but nontrivial) means to reduce the constant coefficient on that part of the error in exchange for $\Theta(n)$ growth with in the other term.

I admit, as of the time of this writing I still don’t understand how to set production security parameters for LWE. Is it still linear in $n$? Super-linear? Not sure. I’m betting future Jeremy will clarify this to me in another article. Even if it were linear in $n$, the right term multiplies $\sigma$ by $\sqrt{n \log n}$ which makes the whole thing super-linear, whereas the left term adds a square root factor. So the tradeoff in $k$ should still help.

Until I understand LWE security, I won’t have the asymptotics I need to analyze this further. Moreover, the allowed values of $B, k$ are so small that we can brute force evaluate all options. For example, if $B = 16$ then $k$ can be between 0 and 7. And realistically, if $n \approx 2^{10}$, then letting $k = 4$ makes the first term roughly $2^{26}$, which leaves only 6 bits left for the message (further reduced by any error introduced by the second term).

Thanks to Cathie Yun and Asra Ali for providing feedback on an early draft of this article.

Until next time!