Searching for RH Counterexamples — Exploring Data

We’re ironically searching for counterexamples to the Riemann Hypothesis.

  1. Setting up Pytest
  2. Adding a Database
  3. Search Strategies
  4. Unbounded integers
  5. Deploying with Docker
  6. Performance Profiling
  7. Scaling up
  8. Productionizing

In the last article we added a menagerie of “production readiness” features like continuous integration tooling (automating test running and static analysis), alerting, and a simple deployment automation. Then I let it loose on AWS, got extremely busy with buying a house, forgot about this program for a few weeks (no alerts means it worked flawlessly!), and then saw my AWS bill.

So I copied the database off AWS using pg_dump (piped to gzip), terminated the instances, and inspected the results. A copy of the database is here. You may need git-lfs to clone it. If I wanted to start it back up again, I could spin them back up, and use gunzip | psql to restore the database, and it would start back up from where it left off. A nice benefit of all the software engineering work done thus far.

This article will summarize some of the data, show plots, and try out some exploratory data analysis techniques.

Summary

We stopped the search mid-way through the set of numbers with 136 prime divisors.

The largest number processed was

1255923956750926940807079376257388805204
00410625719434151527143279285143764977392
49474111379646103102793414829651500824447
17178682617437033476033026987651806835743
3694669721205424205654368862231754214894
07691711699791787732382878164959602478352
11435434547040000

Which in factored form is the product of these terms

  2^8   3^7   5^4   7^4  11^3  13^3  17^2  19^2  23^2  29^2
 31^2  37^2  41^2  43^1  47^1  53^1  59^1  61^1  67^1  71^1
 73^1  79^1  83^1  89^1  97^1 101^1 103^1 107^1 109^1 113^1
127^1 131^1 137^1 139^1 149^1 151^1 157^1 163^1 167^1 173^1
179^1 181^1 191^1 193^1 197^1 199^1 211^1 223^1 227^1 229^1
233^1 239^1 241^1 251^1 257^1 263^1 269^1 271^1 277^1 281^1
283^1 293^1 307^1 311^1 313^1 317^1 331^1 337^1 347^1 349^1
353^1 359^1 367^1 373^1 379^1 383^1 389^1 397^1 401^1 409^1
419^1 421^1 431^1 433^1 439^1 443^1 449^1 457^1 461^1 463^1
467^1 479^1 487^1 491^1 499^1 503^1 509^1 521^1 523^1 541^1
547^1 557^1 563^1 569^1 571^1 577^1

The best witness—the number with the largest witness value—was

38824169178385494306912668979787078930475
9208283469279319659854547822438432284497
11994812030251439907246255647505123032869
03750131483244222351596015366602420554736
87070007801035106854341150889235475446938
52188272225341139870856016797627204990720000

which has witness value 1.7707954880001586, which is still significantly smaller than the needed 1.782 to disprove RH.

The factored form of the best witness is

 2^11   3^7   5^4   7^3  11^3  13^2  17^2  19^2  23^2  29^2 
 31^2  37^1  41^1  43^1  47^1  53^1  59^1  61^1  67^1  71^1 
 73^1  79^1  83^1  89^1  97^1 101^1 103^1 107^1 109^1 113^1 
127^1 131^1 137^1 139^1 149^1 151^1 157^1 163^1 167^1 173^1 
179^1 181^1 191^1 193^1 197^1 199^1 211^1 223^1 227^1 229^1 
233^1 239^1 241^1 251^1 257^1 263^1 269^1 271^1 277^1 281^1 
283^1 293^1 307^1 311^1 313^1 317^1 331^1 337^1 347^1 349^1 
353^1 359^1 367^1 373^1 379^1 383^1 389^1 397^1 401^1 409^1 
419^1 421^1 431^1 433^1 439^1 443^1 449^1 457^1 461^1 463^1 
467^1 479^1 487^1 491^1 499^1 503^1 509^1 521^1 523^1 541^1 
547^1 557^1 563^1 

The average search block took 4m15s to compute, while the max took 7m7s and the min took 36s.

The search ran for about 55 days (hiccups included), starting at 2021-03-05 05:47:53 and stopping at 2021-04-28 15:06:25. The total AWS bill—including development, and periods where the application was broken but the instances still running, and including instances I wasn’t using but forgot to turn off—was $380.25. When the application was running at its peak, the bill worked out to about $100/month, though I think I could get it much lower by deploying fewer instances, after we made the performance optimizations that reduced the need for resource-heavy instances. There is also the possibility of using something that integrates more tightly with AWS, such as serverless jobs for the cleanup, generate, and process worker jobs.

Plots

When in doubt, plot it out. I started by writing an export function to get the data into a simpler CSV, which for each n only stored \log(n) and the witness value.

I did this once for the final computation results. I’ll call this the “small” database because it only contains the largest witness value in each block. I did it again for an earlier version of the database before we introduced optimizations (I’ll call this the “large” database), which had all witness values for all superabundant numbers processed up to 80 prime factors.. The small database was only a few dozen megabytes in size, and the large database was ~40 GiB, so I had to use postgres cursors to avoid loading the large database into memory. Moreover, then generated CSV was about 8 GiB in size, and so it required a few extra steps to sort it, and get it into a format that could be plotted in a reasonable amount of time.

First, using GNU sort to sort the file by the first column, \log(n)

sort -t , -n -k 1 divisor_sums.csv -o divisor_sums_sorted.csv

Then, I needed to do some simple operations on massive CSV files, including computing a cumulative max, and filtering down to a subset of rows that are sufficient for plotting. After trying to use pandas and vaex, I realized that the old awk command line tool would be great at this job. So I wrote a simple awk script to process the data, and compute data used for the cumulative max witness value plots below.

Then finally we can use vaex to create two plots. The first is a heatmap of witness value counts. The second is a plot of the cumulative max witness value. For the large database:

Witness value heatmap for the large database
The cumulative maximum witness value for the large database.

And for the small database

A heatmap for the witness values for the small database
The cumulative maximum witness value for the small database.

Note, the two ridges disagree slightly (the large database shows a longer flat line than the small database for the same range), because of the way that the superabundant enumeration doesn’t go in increasing order of n. So larger witness values in the range 400-500 are found later.

Estimating the max witness value growth rate

The next obvious question is whether we can fit the curves above to provide an estimate of how far we might have to look to find the first witness value that exceeds the desired 1.782 threshold. Of course, this will obviously depend on the appropriateness of the underlying model.

A simple first guess would be split between two options: the real data is asymptotic like a + b / x approaching some number less than 1.782 (and hence this approach cannot disprove RH), or the real data grows slowly (perhaps doubly-logarithmic) like a + b \log \log x, but eventually surpasses 1.782 (and RH is false). For both cases, we can use scipy’s curve fitting routine as in this pull request.

For the large database (roughly using log n < 400 since that’s when the curve flatlines due to the enumeration order), we get a reciprocal fit of

\displaystyle f(x) \approx 1.77579122 - 2.72527824 / x

and a logarithmic fit of

\displaystyle f(x) \approx 1.65074314 + 0.06642373 \log(\log(x))

The fit of the large database to a + b/x. Note the asymptote of 1.7757 suggests this will not disprove RH.
The fit of the large database to a + b log log x. If this is accurate, we would find the counterexample around log(n) = 1359.

The estimated asymptote is around 1.7757 in the first case, and the second case estimates we’d find an RH counterexample at around log(n) = 1359.

For the small database of only sufficiently large witness values, this time going up to about log(n) \approx 575, the asymptotic approximation is

\displaystyle 1.77481154 -2.31226382 / x

And the logarithmic approximation is

\displaystyle 1.70825262 + 0.03390312 \log(\log(x))

The reciprocal approximation of the small database with asymptote 1.77481154
The logarithmic approximation of the small database with RH counterexample estimate at log(n) = 6663

Now the asymptote is slightly lower, at 1.7748, and the logarithmic model approximates the counterexample can be found at approximately \log(n) = 6663.

Both of the logarithmic approximations suggest that if we want to find an RH counterexample, we would need to look at numbers with thousands of prime factors. The first estimate puts a counterexample at about 2^{1960}, the second at 2^{9612}, so let’s say between 1k and 10k prime factors.

Luckily, we can actually jump forward in the superabundant enumeration to exactly the set of candidates with m prime factors. So it might make sense to jump ahead to, say, 5k prime factors and search in that region. However, the size of a level set of the superabundant enumeration still grows exponentially in m. Perhaps we should (heuristically) narrow down the search space by looking for patterns in the distribution of prime factors for the best witness values we’ve found thus far. Perhaps the values of n with the best witness values tend to have a certain concentration of prime factors.

Exploring prime factorizations

At first, my thought was to take the largest witness values, look at their prime factorizations, and try to see a pattern when compared to smaller witness values. However, other than the obvious fact that the larger witness values correspond to larger numbers (more and larger prime factors), I didn’t see an obvious pattern from squinting at plots.

To go in a completely different direction, I wanted to try out the UMAP software package, a very nice and mathematically sophisticated for high dimensional data visualization. It’s properly termed a dimensionality reduction technique, meaning it takes as input a high-dimensional set of data, and produces as output a low-dimensional embedding of that data that tries to maintain the same shape as the input, where “shape” is in the sense of a certain Riemannian metric inferred from the high dimensional data. If there is structure among the prime factorizations, then UMAP should plot a pretty picture, and perhaps that will suggest some clearer approach.

To apply this to the RH witness value dataset, we can take each pair (n, \sigma(n)/(n \log \log n)), and associate that with a new (high dimensional) data point corresponding to the witness value paired with the number’s prime factorization

\displaystyle (\sigma(n)/(n \log \log n), k_1, k_2, \dots, k_d),

where n = 2^{k_1} 3^{k_2} 5^{k_3} \dots p_d^{k_d}, with zero-exponents included so that all points have the same dimension. This pull request adds the ability to factorize and export the witness values to a CSV file as specified, and this pull request adds the CSV data (using git-lfs), along with the script to run UMAP, the resulting plots shown below, and the saved embeddings as .npy files (numpy arrays).

When we do nothing special to the data and run it through UMAP we see this plot.

UMAP plotted on the raw prime factorization and witness value dataset.

It looks cool, but if you stare at it for long enough (and if you zoom in when you generate the plot yourself in matplotlib) you can convince yourself that it’s not finding much useful structure. The red dots dominate (lower witness values) and the blue dots are kind of spread haphazardly throughout the red regions. The “ridges” along the chart are probably due to how the superabundant enumeration skips lots of numbers, and that’s why it thins out on one end: the thinning out corresponds to fewer numbers processed that are that large since the enumeration is not uniform.

It also seemed like there is too much data. The plot above has some 80k points on it. After filtering down to just those points whose witness values are bigger than 1.769, we get a more manageable plot.

Witness values and prime factors processed with UMAP, where the witness value is at least 1.769.

This is a bit more reasonable. You can see a stripe of blue dots going through the middle of the plot.

Before figuring out how that blue ridge might relate to the prime factor patterns, let’s take this a few steps further. Typically in machine learning contexts, it helps to normalize your data, i.e., to transform each input dimension into a standard Z-score with respect to the set of values seen in that dimension, subtracting the mean and dividing by the standard deviation. Since the witness values are so close to each other, they’re a good candidate for such normalization. Here’s what UMAP plots when we normalize the witness value column only.

UMAP applied to the (normalized) witness values and prime factorizations. Applied to all witness values.

Now this is a bit more interesting! Here the colormap on the right is in units of standard deviation of witness values. You can see a definite bluest region, and it appears that the data is organized into long brushstrokes, where the witness values increase as you move from one end of the stroke to the other. At worst, this suggests that the dataset has structure that a learning algorithm could discover.

Going even one step further, what if we normalize all the columns? Well, it’s not as interesting.

UMAP when normalizing all columns, not just the witness value.

If you zoom in, you can see that the same sort of “brushstroke” idea is occurring here too, with blue on one end and red on the other. It’s just harder to see.

The previous image, zoomed in around a cluster of data

We would like to study the prettiest picture and see if we can determine what pattern of prime numbers the blue region has, if any. The embedding files are stored on github, and I put up (one version of) the UMAP visualization as an interactive plot via this pull request.

I’ve been sitting on this draft for a while, and while this article didn’t make a ton of headway, the pictures will have to do while I’m still dealing with my new home purchase.

Some ideas for next steps:

  • Squint harder at the distributions of primes for the largest witness values in comparison to the rest.
  • See if a machine learning algorithm can regress witness values based on their prime factorizations (and any other useful features I can derive). Study the resulting hypothesis to determine which features are the most important. Use that to refine the search strategy.
  • Try searching randomly in the superabundant enumeration around 1k and 10k prime factors, and see if the best witness values found there match the log-log regression.
  • Since witness values above a given threshold seem to be quite common, and because the UMAP visualization shows some possible “locality” structure for larger witness values, it suggests if there is a counterexample to RH then there are probably many. So a local search method (e.g., local neighborhood search/discrete gradient ascent with random restarts) might allow us to get a better sense for whether we are on the right track.

Until next time!

Visualizing an Assassin Puzzle

Over at Math3ma, Tai-Danae Bradley shared the following puzzle, which she also featured in a fantastic (spoiler-free) YouTube video. If you’re seeing this for the first time, watch the video first.

Consider a square in the xy-plane, and let A (an “assassin”) and T (a “target”) be two arbitrary-but-fixed points within the square. Suppose that the square behaves like a billiard table, so that any ray (a.k.a “shot”) from the assassin will bounce off the sides of the square, with the angle of incidence equaling the angle of reflection.

Puzzle: Is it possible to block any possible shot from A to T by placing a finite number of points in the square?

This puzzle found its way to me through Tai-Danae’s video, via category theorist Emily Riehl, via a talk by the recently deceased Fields Medalist Maryam Mirzakhani, who studied the problem in more generality. I’m not familiar with her work, but knowing mathematicians it’s probably set in an arbitrary complex n-manifold.

See Tai-Danae’s post for a proof, which left such an impression on me I had to dig deeper. In this post I’ll discuss a visualization I made—now posted at the end of Tai-Danae’s article—as well as here and below (to avoid spoilers). In the visualization, mouse movement chooses the firing direction for the assassin, and the target is in green. Dragging the target with the mouse updates the position of the guards. The source code is on Github.

Outline

The visualization uses d3 library, which was made for visualizations that dynamically update with data. I use it because it can draw SVGs real nice.

The meat of the visualization is in two geometric functions.

  1. Decompose a ray into a series of line segments—its path as it bounces off the walls—stopping if it intersects any of the points in the plane.
  2. Compute the optimal position of the guards, given the boundary square and the positions of the assassin and target.

Both of these functions, along with all the geometry that supports them, is in geometry.js. The rest of the demo is defined in main.js, in which I oafishly trample over d3 best practices to arrive miraculously at a working product. Critiques welcome 🙂

As with most programming and software problems, the key to implementing these functions while maintaining your sanity is breaking it down into manageable pieces. Incrementalism is your friend.

Vectors, rays, rectangles, and ray splitting

We start at the bottom with a Vector class with helpful methods for adding, scaling, and computing norms and inner products.

function innerProduct(a, b) {
  return a.x * b.x + a.y * b.y;
}

class Vector {
  constructor(x, y) {
    this.x = x;
    this.y = y;
  }

  normalized() { ... }
  norm() { ... }
  add(vector) { ... }
  subtract(vector) { ... }
  scale(length) { ... }
  distance(vector) { ... }
  midpoint(b) { ... }
}

This allows one to compute the distance between two points, e.g., with vector.subtract(otherVector).norm().

Next we define a class for a ray, which is represented by its center (a vector) and a direction (a vector).

class Ray {
  constructor(center, direction, length=100000) {
    this.center = center;
    this.length = length;

    if (direction.x == 0 && direction.y == 0) {
      throw "Can't have zero direction";
    }
    this.direction = direction.normalized();
  }

  endpoint() {
    return this.center.add(this.direction.scale(this.length));
  }

  intersects(point) {
    let shiftedPoint = point.subtract(this.center);
    let signedLength = innerProduct(shiftedPoint, this.direction);
    let projectedVector = this.direction.scale(signedLength);
    let differenceVector = shiftedPoint.subtract(projectedVector);

    if (signedLength > 0
        && this.length > signedLength
        && differenceVector.norm() < intersectionRadius) {
      return projectedVector.add(this.center);
    } else {
      return null;
    }
  }
}

The ray must be finite for us to draw it, but the length we've chosen is so large that, as you can see in the visualization, it's effectively infinite. Feel free to scale it up even longer.

assassin-puzzle

The interesting bit is the intersection function. We want to compute whether a ray intersects a point. To do this, we use the inner product as a decision rule to compute the distance of a point from a line. If that distance is very small, we say they intersect.

In our demo points are not infinitesimal, but rather have a small radius described by intersectionRadius. For the sake of being able to see anything we set this to 3 pixels. If it’s too small the demo will look bad. The ray won’t stop when it should appear to stop, and it can appear to hit the target when it doesn’t.

Next up we have a class for a Rectangle, which is where the magic happens. The boilerplate and helper methods:

class Rectangle {
  constructor(bottomLeft, topRight) {
    this.bottomLeft = bottomLeft;
    this.topRight = topRight;
  }

  topLeft() { ... }
  center() { ... }
  width() { .. }
  height() { ... }
  contains(vector) { ... }

The function rayToPoints that splits a ray into line segments from bouncing depends on three helper functions:

  1. rayIntersection: Compute the intersection point of a ray with the rectangle.
  2. isOnVerticalWall: Determine if a point is on a vertical or horizontal wall of the rectangle, raising an error if neither.
  3. splitRay: Split a ray into a line segment and a shorter ray that’s “bounced” off the wall of the rectangle.

(2) is trivial, computing some x- and y-coordinate distances up to some error tolerance. (1) involves parameterizing the ray and checking one of four inequalities. If the bottom left of the rectangle is (x_1, y_1) and the top right is (x_2, y_2) and the ray is written as \{ (c_1 + t v_1, c_2 + t v_2) \mid t > 0 \}, then—with some elbow grease—the following four equations provide all possibilities, with some special cases for vertical or horizontal rays:

\displaystyle \begin{aligned} c_2 + t v_2 &= y_2 & \textup{ and } \hspace{2mm} & x_1 \leq c_1 + t v_1 \leq x_2 & \textup{ (intersects top)} \\ c_2 + t v_2 &= y_1 & \textup{ and } \hspace{2mm} & x_1 \leq c_1 + t v_1 \leq x_2 & \textup{ (intersects bottom)} \\ c_1 + t v_1 &= x_1 & \textup{ and } \hspace{2mm} & y_1 \leq c_2 + t v_2 \leq y_2 & \textup{ (intersects left)} \\ c_1 + t v_1 &= x_2 & \textup{ and } \hspace{2mm} & y_1 \leq c_2 + t v_2 \leq y_2 & \textup{ (intersects right)} \\ \end{aligned}

In code:

  rayIntersection(ray) {
    let c1 = ray.center.x;
    let c2 = ray.center.y;
    let v1 = ray.direction.x;
    let v2 = ray.direction.y;
    let x1 = this.bottomLeft.x;
    let y1 = this.bottomLeft.y;
    let x2 = this.topRight.x;
    let y2 = this.topRight.y;

    // ray is vertically up or down
    if (epsilon > Math.abs(v1)) {
      return new Vector(c1, (v2 > 0 ? y2 : y1));
    }

    // ray is horizontally left or right
    if (epsilon > Math.abs(v2)) {
      return new Vector((v1 > 0 ? x2 : x1), c2);
    }

    let tTop = (y2 - c2) / v2;
    let tBottom = (y1 - c2) / v2;
    let tLeft = (x1 - c1) / v1;
    let tRight = (x2 - c1) / v1;

    // Exactly one t value should be both positive and result in a point
    // within the rectangle

    let tValues = [tTop, tBottom, tLeft, tRight];
    for (let i = 0; i  epsilon && this.contains(intersection)) {
        return intersection;
      }
    } 

    throw "Unexpected error: ray never intersects rectangle!";
  }

Next, splitRay splits a ray into a single line segment and the “remaining” ray, by computing the ray’s intersection with the rectangle, and having the “remaining” ray mirror the direction of approach with a new center that lies on the wall of the rectangle. The new ray length is appropriately shorter. If we run out of ray length, we simply return a segment with a null ray.

  splitRay(ray) {
    let segment = [ray.center, this.rayIntersection(ray)];
    let segmentLength = segment[0].subtract(segment[1]).norm();
    let remainingLength = ray.length - segmentLength;

    if (remainingLength < 10) {
      return {
        segment: [ray.center, ray.endpoint()],
        ray: null
      };
    }

    let vertical = this.isOnVerticalWall(segment[1]);
    let newRayDirection = null;

    if (vertical) {
      newRayDirection = new Vector(-ray.direction.x, ray.direction.y);
    } else {
      newRayDirection = new Vector(ray.direction.x, -ray.direction.y);
    }

    let newRay = new Ray(segment[1], newRayDirection, length=remainingLength);
    return {
      segment: segment,
      ray: newRay
    };
  }

As you have probably guessed, rayToPoints simply calls splitRay over and over again until the ray hits an input “stopping point”—a guard, the target, or the assassin—or else our finite ray length has been exhausted. The output is a list of points, starting from the original ray’s center, for which adjacent pairs are interpreted as line segments to draw.

  rayToPoints(ray, stoppingPoints) {
    let points = [ray.center];
    let remainingRay = ray;

    while (remainingRay) {
      // check if the ray would hit any guards or the target
      if (stoppingPoints) {
        let hardStops = stoppingPoints.map(p => remainingRay.intersects(p))
          .filter(p => p != null);
        if (hardStops.length > 0) {
          // find first intersection and break
          let closestStop = remainingRay.closestToCenter(hardStops);
          points.push(closestStop);
          break;
        }
      }

      let rayPieces = this.splitRay(remainingRay);
      points.push(rayPieces.segment[1]);
      remainingRay = rayPieces.ray;
    } 

    return points;
  }

That’s sufficient to draw the shot emanating from the assassin. This method is called every time the mouse moves.

Optimal guards

The function to compute the optimal position of the guards takes as input the containing rectangle, the assassin, and the target, and produces as output a list of 16 points.

/*
 * Compute the 16 optimal guards to prevent the assassin from hitting the
 * target.
 */
function computeOptimalGuards(square, assassin, target) {
...
}

If you read Tai-Danae’s proof, you’ll know that this construction is to

  1. Compute mirrors of the target across the top, the right, and the top+right of the rectangle. Call this resulting thing the 4-mirrored-targets.
  2. Replicate the 4-mirrored-targets four times, by translating three of the copies left by the entire width of the 4-mirrored-targets shape, down by the entire height, and both left-and-down.
  3. Now you have 16 copies of the target, and one assassin. This gives 16 line segments from assassin-to-target-copy. Place a guard at the midpoint of each of these line segments.
  4. Finally, apply the reverse translation and reverse mirroring to return the guards to the original square.

Due to WordPress being a crappy blogging platform I need to migrate off of, the code snippets below have been magically disappearing. I’ve included links to github lines as well.

Step 1 (after adding simple helper functions on Rectangle to do the mirroring):

  // First compute the target copies in the 4 mirrors
  let target1 = target.copy();
  let target2 = square.mirrorTop(target);
  let target3 = square.mirrorRight(target);
  let target4 = square.mirrorTop(square.mirrorRight(target));
  target1.guardLabel = 1;
  target2.guardLabel = 2;
  target3.guardLabel = 3;
  target4.guardLabel = 4;

Step 2:

  // for each mirrored target, compute the four two-square-length translates
  let mirroredTargets = [target1, target2, target3, target4];
  let horizontalShift = 2 * square.width();
  let verticalShift = 2 * square.height();
  let translateLeft = new Vector(-horizontalShift, 0);
  let translateRight = new Vector(horizontalShift, 0);
  let translateUp = new Vector(0, verticalShift);
  let translateDown = new Vector(0, -verticalShift);

  let translatedTargets = [];
  for (let i = 0; i < mirroredTargets.length; i++) {
    let target = mirroredTargets[i];
    translatedTargets.push([
      target,
      target.add(translateLeft),
      target.add(translateDown),
      target.add(translateLeft).add(translateDown),
    ]);
  }

Step 3, computing the midpoints:

  // compute the midpoints between the assassin and each translate
  let translatedMidpoints = [];
  for (let i = 0; i  t.midpoint(assassin)));
  }

Step 4, returning the guards back to the original square, is harder than it seems, because the midpoint of an assassin-to-target-copy segment might not be in the same copy of the square as the target-copy being fired at. This means you have to detect which square copy the midpoint lands in, and use that to determine which operations are required to invert. This results in the final block of this massive function.

  // determine which of the four possible translates the midpoint is in
  // and reverse the translation. Since midpoints can end up in completely
  // different copies of the square, we have to check each one for all cases.
  function untranslate(point) {
    if (point.x  square.bottomLeft.y) {
      return point.add(translateRight);
    } else if (point.x >= square.bottomLeft.x && point.y <= square.bottomLeft.y) {
      return point.add(translateUp);
    } else if (point.x < square.bottomLeft.x && point.y <= square.bottomLeft.y) {
      return point.add(translateRight).add(translateUp);
    } else {
      return point;
    }
  }

  // undo the translations to get the midpoints back to the original 4-mirrored square.
  let untranslatedMidpoints = [];
  for (let i = 0; i  square.topRight.x && point.y > square.topRight.y) {
      return square.mirrorTop(square.mirrorRight(point));
    } else if (point.x > square.topRight.x && point.y <= square.topRight.y) {
      return square.mirrorRight(point);
    } else if (point.x  square.topRight.y) {
      return square.mirrorTop(point);
    } else {
      return point;
    }
  }

  return untranslatedMidpoints.map(unmirror);

And that’s all there is to it!

Improvements, if I only had the time

There are a few improvements I’d like to make to this puzzle, but haven’t made the time (I’m writing a book, after all!).

  1. Be able to drag the guards around.
  2. Create new guards from an empty set of guards, with a button to “reveal” the solution.
  3. Include a toggle that, when pressed, darkens the entire region of the square that can be hit by the assassin. For example, this would allow you to see if the target is in the only possible safe spot, or if there are multiple safe spots for a given configuration.
  4. Perhaps darken the vulnerable spots by the number of possible paths that hit it, up to some limit.
  5. The most complicated one: generalize to an arbitrary polygon (convex or not!), for which there may be no optional solution. The visualization would allow you to look for a solution using 2-4.

Pull requests are welcome if you attempt any of these improvements.

Until next time!